Tuesday, December 7, 2021

Comments due to the MN DNR on December 8

 We’re gaining momentum at a critical time in the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters. In Minnesota, Fox 9 TV News covered our work on Friday!

“At issue is the long planned Twin Metals mine on the edge of the [Boundary Waters]. Opponents sued the state alleging current mining regulation isn't strong enough, so the DNR is taking public comments through next Wednesday, and the Save the Boundary Waters group is pushing for a flood of input before that closes.”

FOX 9 KMSP, Dec 3, 2021


You have just three days left to submit your comment to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in support of banning dangerous copper mining near the Boundary Waters Wilderness, or if you already have, share this link with your friends and family and urge them to take action. 

We’ve made it easy and quick - you can use our template and add in your personal connection or reasons to protect the Boundary Waters. 

You can and should submit comments no matter where you live - you don’t have to be from Minnesota to participate in this historic, national effort.


Why is this so important?

Because of a first-of-its kind lawsuit we brought under the Minnesota Environmental Rights Act, the state of Minnesota is now re-examining its outdated mining rules that fail to protect the Boundary Waters. This review could result in a ban on sulfide-ore copper mining in the headwaters of the Wilderness!


This Wednesday, December 8 is the last day you can participate in this public comment period - a historic chance for those that care about the fate of this priceless wilderness to make the case that America’s most toxic industry should never be allowed next to America’s most popular wilderness.


If thousands of people take the time to write to the Minnesota DNR, we can send a clear message to decision makers: sulfide-ore copper mining should be banned from the watershed of the Boundary Waters permanently. This is the only way to protect the Wilderness and downstream waters in Quetico Provincial Park and Voyageurs National Park from pollution and destruction.